Maptacular

A BLOG OF MAPS, MAPPING, MAPMAKERS... AND MORE MAPS.

259 notes

radhistory:

The 1889 London Underground Tube map
Originally, the development of the London Underground was taken by many different companies, so for a long time there was no specific map showing all routes. You’ll notice these are different from the modern map as they are not schematic and the stations are just overlaid on a normal map of the terrain. Therefore, these older maps would have been made by normal traditional cartographers.

The 1908 Tube Map
This was the first time a combined map was published, thanks to the separate companies forming a conglomerate called the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (later absorbed into the TFL we know and love). You’ll notice this still has the traditional map outlines of the overland terrain.

The 1926 Tube Map
This map was designed by a man called Mcdonald McGill and was the first map to have a blank background instead of being overlaid on top of the overland terrain. Good going, Mcdonald; if you’re underneath it anyway who gives a shit where the Thames is.

Harry Beck’s 1933 Tube Map
This is where it really kicks off. This may no doubt be familiar to anyone who has travelled around London because it’s the traditional schematic diagram you’re used to looking at to get around. All this means is that geographical location and distance is sacrificed in order to make the locations, transfers and overall context easier. You try using the 1926 to get around instead of this; you might as well try and divinate with tramp puke.

1960’s Tube Map
Swinging London’s developments

Real life Map of the Underground stations.
See? Looks like you’d be trying to navigate with shoelaces.
Source source source

radhistory:

The 1889 London Underground Tube map

Originally, the development of the London Underground was taken by many different companies, so for a long time there was no specific map showing all routes. You’ll notice these are different from the modern map as they are not schematic and the stations are just overlaid on a normal map of the terrain. Therefore, these older maps would have been made by normal traditional cartographers.

1908

The 1908 Tube Map

This was the first time a combined map was published, thanks to the separate companies forming a conglomerate called the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (later absorbed into the TFL we know and love). You’ll notice this still has the traditional map outlines of the overland terrain.

1926

The 1926 Tube Map

This map was designed by a man called Mcdonald McGill and was the first map to have a blank background instead of being overlaid on top of the overland terrain. Good going, Mcdonald; if you’re underneath it anyway who gives a shit where the Thames is.

1933

Harry Beck’s 1933 Tube Map

This is where it really kicks off. This may no doubt be familiar to anyone who has travelled around London because it’s the traditional schematic diagram you’re used to looking at to get around. All this means is that geographical location and distance is sacrificed in order to make the locations, transfers and overall context easier. You try using the 1926 to get around instead of this; you might as well try and divinate with tramp puke.

1960

1960’s Tube Map

Swinging London’s developments

real life

Real life Map of the Underground stations.

See? Looks like you’d be trying to navigate with shoelaces.

Source source source

(via mapsontheweb)

Filed under london underground tube maps mapping

1 note

Geography of Car Thefts in the United States
“The National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) each year takes a look at the national picture in terms of car thefts.  Back in 1984 when NICB first started its annual Hot Spot reports, California still led the nation in overall car thefts, with 161,309 that year.  New York led the nation in number of thefts per registrations at 1,303.  The peak of car thefts was 1991 with 1.6 million cars stolen that year.  The numbers have been dropping thanks to better automobile technology that makes it easier to track stolen vehicles and increased law enforcement resources on car thefts.  For 2013, there were less than 700,000 vehicles stolen, a 58% decline since the peak 22 years ago.”
Via GeoLounge

Geography of Car Thefts in the United States

The National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) each year takes a look at the national picture in terms of car thefts.  Back in 1984 when NICB first started its annual Hot Spot reports, California still led the nation in overall car thefts, with 161,309 that year.  New York led the nation in number of thefts per registrations at 1,303.  The peak of car thefts was 1991 with 1.6 million cars stolen that year.  The numbers have been dropping thanks to better automobile technology that makes it easier to track stolen vehicles and increased law enforcement resources on car thefts.  For 2013, there were less than 700,000 vehicles stolen, a 58% decline since the peak 22 years ago.”

Via GeoLounge

Filed under car crime maps mapping theft

3 notes

Mapping Portland’s Urban Predators
“The Portland/Vancouver region has 40,000 acres of natural areas, including 15,000 managed by Metro,” says Jonathan Soll, Metro’s science and stewardship manager. “Predators are part of nature, and a certain amount of contact is inevitable.” (Attacks, however, are rare.) Most carnivores that wander the urban landscape are just passing through, often young adults forced to seek out unclaimed territory. “Portlanders like green spaces, and these natural corridors can act as highways for wildlife to come and go,” says Don Whittaker, a biologist at Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. And, perhaps, remind us that we’re not the only big, formidable animals around here.”
Via Portland Monthly

Mapping Portland’s Urban Predators

“The Portland/Vancouver region has 40,000 acres of natural areas, including 15,000 managed by Metro,” says Jonathan Soll, Metro’s science and stewardship manager. “Predators are part of nature, and a certain amount of contact is inevitable.” (Attacks, however, are rare.) Most carnivores that wander the urban landscape are just passing through, often young adults forced to seek out unclaimed territory. “Portlanders like green spaces, and these natural corridors can act as highways for wildlife to come and go,” says Don Whittaker, a biologist at Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. And, perhaps, remind us that we’re not the only big, formidable animals around here.”

Via Portland Monthly

Filed under portland oregon maps mapping predators bears wolves coyotes

0 notes

These Maps Show Ebola’s Spread In and Around Liberia’s Capital
“Last Tuesday, the White House announced plans to send 3,000 US troops to the country to coordinate medical care and deliver humanitarian aid. Their command center, and much of their work, will be in Monrovia. But as the maps below show, controlling the disease in and around the sprawling city will not be an easy task. This first map shows the spread of the disease in the capital region as of September 11 (areas colored in darker shades of blue have reported more Ebola infections):”
Via Mother Jones

These Maps Show Ebola’s Spread In and Around Liberia’s Capital

Last Tuesday, the White House announced plans to send 3,000 US troops to the country to coordinate medical care and deliver humanitarian aid. Their command center, and much of their work, will be in Monrovia. But as the maps below show, controlling the disease in and around the sprawling city will not be an easy task. This first map shows the spread of the disease in the capital region as of September 11 (areas colored in darker shades of blue have reported more Ebola infections):”

Via Mother Jones

Filed under maps mapping ebola liberia disease africa epidemic

255 notes

micdotcom:

Maps show the most needed job skills in every state

If you’re on the job market, chances are you should brush up on your analysis skills.

That’s according to data provided to Mic by LinkedIn and Hunch Analytics, a technology consultancy.

The data shows the most frequently mentioned skills in job openings for each state, indicating which skills are most in demand. The word “analysis” is the most common word on job descriptions in 19 states and Washington, D.C.

Where finance, leadership and networking are needed | Follow micdotcom

Filed under maps mapping skill career job

4 notes

Where the U.S. gets its domestic oil and gas, in two maps

The crude oil boom in the western United States has changed the way states do business. North Dakota is growing so rapidly that the legislature is considering returning to special session to make big investments in new infrastructure. Wyoming now receives more than half its tax dollars from oil and gas companies paying to extract fuel. And big parts of Colorado, California, Texas, Oklahoma and a handful of other states increasingly rely on the energy industry for jobs.”

Via The Washington Post

Filed under oil maps mapping gas fracking

9 notes

Schoolgirl maps from the early republic
“I’ve been preoccupied lately with student manuscript maps, generally made by girls between 11 and 18 attending one of the many female academies of the American northeast between 1800 and 1830. “Map study” — as it was often termed — was a way for the girls to learn not just geography, but also to practice penmanship, drawing, and to improve their memory. What’s particularly interesting is that this was never part of a prescribed curriculum handed down to the individual schools, but a practice that spread when the students themselves became teachers at other schools. I’ve found hundreds of maps, most of which were drawn in the many schools that spread through the Connecticut River Valley, from Connecticut and Massachusetts up into Vermont and New Hampshire by the 1810s and 1820s.”
Via Mapping the Nation

Schoolgirl maps from the early republic

I’ve been preoccupied lately with student manuscript maps, generally made by girls between 11 and 18 attending one of the many female academies of the American northeast between 1800 and 1830. “Map study” — as it was often termed — was a way for the girls to learn not just geography, but also to practice penmanship, drawing, and to improve their memory. What’s particularly interesting is that this was never part of a prescribed curriculum handed down to the individual schools, but a practice that spread when the students themselves became teachers at other schools. I’ve found hundreds of maps, most of which were drawn in the many schools that spread through the Connecticut River Valley, from Connecticut and Massachusetts up into Vermont and New Hampshire by the 1810s and 1820s.”

Via Mapping the Nation

Filed under maps mapping cartography republic 1800 1830 nineteenth century

111 notes

uimapcoll:

September 23, 1806: Lewis and Clark return from their trip to the Pacific.

While looking through the collection for a map to celebrate the return of the Lewis and Clark expedition, I came across two maps that I wanted to share. The first is the original map of the expedition as put together by Lewis. The second is an educational map from the Oregon Historical Society. It was fun for me to contrast the two styles and I hope you enjoy.

Maps:

1) Lewis, S. A map of Lewis and Clark’s track across the western portion of North America, from the Mississippi to the Pacific Ocean: by order of the executive of the United States in 1804, 5 & 6. London, England: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, & Brown, Paternoster Row, c1814.

2) Oregon Historical Society. The trail of Lewis and Clark, 1804-1806. Portland, Oregon: >Oregon Historical Society Press, [1986]

Post by Kassie M.

(via mapsandshhtuff)

Filed under maps mapping exploration lewis clark missouri the west