Maptacular

A BLOG OF MAPS, MAPPING, MAPMAKERS... AND MORE MAPS.

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dendroica:

Winter storms bring only fleeting relief to drought-stricken California

After an extremely dry stretch from December through mid-February, a few storms found their way to the drought-stricken California coast late this winter. Unfortunately they were only enough to make a small dent in large water deficits that have built up since the 2011-12 water year. As the North Pacific winter storm season recedes, there is little likelihood for substantial drought recovery. Dry weather has taken hold over the region, increasing water demands and melting mountain snowpack.

(Read more: NOAA Climate.gov)

dendroica:

Winter storms bring only fleeting relief to drought-stricken California

After an extremely dry stretch from December through mid-February, a few storms found their way to the drought-stricken California coast late this winter. Unfortunately they were only enough to make a small dent in large water deficits that have built up since the 2011-12 water year. As the North Pacific winter storm season recedes, there is little likelihood for substantial drought recovery. Dry weather has taken hold over the region, increasing water demands and melting mountain snowpack.

(Read more: NOAA Climate.gov)

(via mapsandshhtuff)

Filed under weather climate drought maps mapping

4 notes

It Takes A City To Map Blight In Detroit

Empowered by technology and the dedication of the community to revitalize their city, the Motor City Mapping Project surveyed every piece of land in Detroit in a mere five weeks.

“

In Detroit, this winter was the worst ever. Not only was the weather brutal, with more than six feet of snow and the harshest conditions of any city in the country, but the city was also grappling with the psychological and economic toll of the massive municipal bankruptcy filed last June.
None of that stopped a crew of 225 people, including 150 citizen temporary employees, from participating in a remarkable feat that will help rebuild their hometown. In a mere 36 days in January and February, they mapped each and every instance of blight of an infamously blighted city, across every last property parcel, all 380,000 of them.”
Learn more at Fast Company

It Takes A City To Map Blight In Detroit

Empowered by technology and the dedication of the community to revitalize their city, the Motor City Mapping Project surveyed every piece of land in Detroit in a mere five weeks.

In Detroit, this winter was the worst ever. Not only was the weather brutal, with more than six feet of snow and the harshest conditions of any city in the country, but the city was also grappling with the psychological and economic toll of the massive municipal bankruptcy filed last June.

None of that stopped a crew of 225 people, including 150 citizen temporary employees, from participating in a remarkable feat that will help rebuild their hometown. In a mere 36 days in January and February, they mapped each and every instance of blight of an infamously blighted city, across every last property parcel, all 380,000 of them.”

Learn more at Fast Company

Filed under FastCoExist fast company maps mapping poverty blight detroit deindustrialization

6 notes

18 Maps From When the World Thought California Was an Island
“The old maps represent an epic cartographic blunder, but they also contain a kernel of truth, the writer Rebecca Solnit argued in a recent essay. “An island is anything surrounded by difference,” she wrote. And California has always been different — isolated by high mountains in the east and north, desert in the south, and the ocean to the west, it has a unique climate and ecology. It’s often seemed like a place apart in other ways too, from the Gold Rush, to the hippies, to the tech booms of modern times.”
Read more at Wired’s Map Lab

18 Maps From When the World Thought California Was an Island

The old maps represent an epic cartographic blunder, but they also contain a kernel of truth, the writer Rebecca Solnit argued in a recent essay. “An island is anything surrounded by difference,” she wrote. And California has always been different — isolated by high mountains in the east and north, desert in the south, and the ocean to the west, it has a unique climate and ecology. It’s often seemed like a place apart in other ways too, from the Gold Rush, to the hippies, to the tech booms of modern times.”

Read more at Wired’s Map Lab

Filed under wired maps mapping california cartography atlas

8 notes

Mapping the Intensity of the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake
These maps come from an atlas that accompanied the 1908 scientific report attempting to explain the causes and effects of the San Francisco earthquake, titled The California Earthquake of April 18, 1906: Report of the State Earthquake Investigation Committee. The two maps use the data that the commission collected to represent the earthquake’s intensity geographically.
See and read more at Slate

Mapping the Intensity of the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake

These maps come from an atlas that accompanied the 1908 scientific report attempting to explain the causes and effects of the San Francisco earthquake, titled The California Earthquake of April 18, 1906: Report of the State Earthquake Investigation Committee. The two maps use the data that the commission collected to represent the earthquake’s intensity geographically.

See and read more at Slate

Filed under slate san francisco earthquake maps mapping cartography

121 notes

theatlantic:

Want to Spot Earth’s First Cousin? Look for the Swan in the Sky

From here on Earth, the planet Kepler-186f is a faint spot in the chaotic and twinkling universe. Its star is dim and far, far away.
But Kepler-186f is making headlines on Earth because, despite its distance, it looks a lot like our own planet.
The Kepler-186 system is in the constellation Cygnus, which stargazers will know as the easy-to-spot swan in the northern hemisphere’s summertime sky. 
From a human perspective, that makes it unusual. Kepler-186f is the first Earth-like planet in the habitable zone around its star that scientists have ever found. (!)
Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

theatlantic:

Want to Spot Earth’s First Cousin? Look for the Swan in the Sky

From here on Earth, the planet Kepler-186f is a faint spot in the chaotic and twinkling universe. Its star is dim and far, far away.

But Kepler-186f is making headlines on Earth because, despite its distance, it looks a lot like our own planet.

The Kepler-186 system is in the constellation Cygnus, which stargazers will know as the easy-to-spot swan in the northern hemisphere’s summertime sky. 

From a human perspective, that makes it unusual. Kepler-186f is the first Earth-like planet in the habitable zone around its star that scientists have ever found. (!)

Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

(via mapsandshhtuff)

Filed under astronomy maps mapping kepler the atlantic

6 notes

A 19th-Century Flowchart Helps You Ask Good Geographical Questions
“Aloisius Edouard Camille Gaultier, a French Catholic priest working as a tutor in England in the late eighteenth century, created this chart to aid students in shaping geographical questions. This chart, which is a basic decision tree, shows what kinds of queries should be grouped together (questions about political status, for example, all flow in one “branch”), and offers a simple hierarchy of types of geographical information.”
Via Slate

A 19th-Century Flowchart Helps You Ask Good Geographical Questions

Aloisius Edouard Camille Gaultier, a French Catholic priest working as a tutor in England in the late eighteenth century, created this chart to aid students in shaping geographical questions. This chart, which is a basic decision tree, shows what kinds of queries should be grouped together (questions about political status, for example, all flow in one “branch”), and offers a simple hierarchy of types of geographical information.”

Via Slate

Filed under slate geography maps mapping