Maptacular

A BLOG OF MAPS, MAPPING, MAPMAKERS... AND MORE MAPS.

6 notes

This Riveting 1830s Temperance Map Warned Against the Dangers of “Beer Lake”
"In the archives of the American Antiquarian Society lies a strange and captivating map with an even more unlikely backstory. The map dates to 1838, though this copy was printed five years later. At first glance it looks as if it depicts a physical place, its islands and topography rendered with care. Closer inspection, however, reveals that this map records no actual location. Instead, it’s an allegory of temperance, framed as a journey through our animal appetites. Originally drawn by a temperance activist from the Northeast identified only as “C. Wiltberger,” the map found a following halfway around the world when the engraved plate was sailed to a small school run by missionaries on the island of Maui. The map asks each one of us: are you on the road to salvation or damnation?”
Via The New Republic

This Riveting 1830s Temperance Map Warned Against the Dangers of “Beer Lake”

"In the archives of the American Antiquarian Society lies a strange and captivating map with an even more unlikely backstory. The map dates to 1838, though this copy was printed five years later. At first glance it looks as if it depicts a physical place, its islands and topography rendered with care. Closer inspection, however, reveals that this map records no actual location. Instead, it’s an allegory of temperance, framed as a journey through our animal appetites. Originally drawn by a temperance activist from the Northeast identified only as “C. Wiltberger,” the map found a following halfway around the world when the engraved plate was sailed to a small school run by missionaries on the island of Maui. The map asks each one of us: are you on the road to salvation or damnation?”

Via The New Republic

Filed under maps mapping temperance beer alcohol

18 notes

These maps of water use show why the Western US is in trouble
“The American West has been wrestling with drought for the past 15 years. California is now facing its worst dry spell in at least a century. So, not surprisingly, the question of how best to manage America’s scarce freshwater supplies is coming up more frequently.
To that end, the Hamilton Project recently published a helpful primer, “Nine Economic Facts about Water in the United States.” The whole thing’s worth reading, but four maps and charts in particular stuck out. For starters, some of the driest states in the West actually have some of the highestrates of household water use.”
Via Vox

These maps of water use show why the Western US is in trouble

The American West has been wrestling with drought for the past 15 years. California is now facing its worst dry spell in at least a century. So, not surprisingly, the question of how best to manage America’s scarce freshwater supplies is coming up more frequently.

To that end, the Hamilton Project recently published a helpful primer, “Nine Economic Facts about Water in the United States.” The whole thing’s worth reading, but four maps and charts in particular stuck out. For starters, some of the driest states in the West actually have some of the highestrates of household water use.”

Via Vox

Filed under maps mapping water shortage drought california

7 notes

The Star Charts That Apollo 11 Astronauts Used to Land on the Moon
"These star charts were part of a guidance and navigation (G&N) dictionary carried by the Apollo 11 lunar module when it reached the moon’s surface on July 20, 1969.


Inside the module, the computer that provided navigation and guidance required astronauts to use a telescope to sight three stars, find their locations on the gridded star chart, and enter their numerical codes into the computer. Triangulating from this information, the computer would redirect the spacecraft onto a desired trajectory.



In an extensive comparative post on Apollo mission star charts and their uses, collector and historian Lawrence McGlynn includes several images of the navigation unit that astronauts used to key in the stars’ numbers, as well as star charts used in earlier and later missions.”

Via Slate’s The Vault

The Star Charts That Apollo 11 Astronauts Used to Land on the Moon

"These star charts were part of a guidance and navigation (G&N) dictionary carried by the Apollo 11 lunar module when it reached the moon’s surface on July 20, 1969.

Inside the module, the computer that provided navigation and guidance required astronauts to use a telescope to sight three stars, find their locations on the gridded star chart, and enter their numerical codes into the computer. Triangulating from this information, the computer would redirect the spacecraft onto a desired trajectory.

In an extensive comparative post on Apollo mission star charts and their uses, collector and historian Lawrence McGlynn includes several images of the navigation unit that astronauts used to key in the stars’ numbers, as well as star charts used in earlier and later missions.”

Via Slate’s The Vault

Filed under maps mapping chart nasa moon lunar astronaut

6 notes

These Beautiful Maps Show How Similarly City Streets are Arranged
"These gloriously rich maps, dripping in trippy neon color, are more insightful than they may first appear—because their hue actually reveal similarities in the way city streets are oriented. Made by Stephen Von Worley, the maps reveals similarities—and differences!—in town planning, from monotonous grid iron to quirky organic sprawl.”
Via Gizmodo

These Beautiful Maps Show How Similarly City Streets are Arranged

"These gloriously rich maps, dripping in trippy neon color, are more insightful than they may first appear—because their hue actually reveal similarities in the way city streets are oriented. Made by Stephen Von Worley, the maps reveals similarities—and differences!—in town planning, from monotonous grid iron to quirky organic sprawl.”

Via Gizmodo

Filed under maps mapping city street manhattan sprawl

24 notes

The Ottoman Empire’s First Map of the Newly Minted United States
"What did the United States look like to Ottoman observers in 1803? In this map, the newly independent U.S. is labeled “The Country of the English People” (“İngliz Cumhurunun Ülkesi”). The Iroquois Confederacy shows up as well, labeled the “Government of the Six Indian Nations.” Other tribes shown on the map include the Algonquin, Chippewa, Western Sioux (Siyu-yu Garbî), Eastern Sioux (Siyu-yu Şarkî), Black Pawnees (Kara Panis), and White Pawnees (Ak Panis).


The Ottoman Empire, which at the time this map was drawn included much of the Balkans and the Middle East, used a version of the Turkish language written in a slightly modified Arabic script. Ottoman script works particularly well on maps, because it allows cartographers to label wide regions by elongating the lines connecting individual letters.”
Via Slate’s The Vault

The Ottoman Empire’s First Map of the Newly Minted United States

"What did the United States look like to Ottoman observers in 1803? In this map, the newly independent U.S. is labeled “The Country of the English People” (“İngliz Cumhurunun Ülkesi”). The Iroquois Confederacy shows up as well, labeled the “Government of the Six Indian Nations.” Other tribes shown on the map include the Algonquin, Chippewa, Western Sioux (Siyu-yu Garbî), Eastern Sioux (Siyu-yu Şarkî), Black Pawnees (Kara Panis), and White Pawnees (Ak Panis).

The Ottoman Empire, which at the time this map was drawn included much of the Balkans and the Middle East, used a version of the Turkish language written in a slightly modified Arabic script. Ottoman script works particularly well on maps, because it allows cartographers to label wide regions by elongating the lines connecting individual letters.”

Via Slate’s The Vault

Filed under maps mapping ottoman turkey america colonies

11 notes

Series of Maps Show Where Single Americans Have the Best Chances of Getting a Date
“
Jonathan Soma is a member of NYU’s faculty and an expert at “making unapproachable data accessible.”
That’s exactly what he’s done with this monolithic project of a map that charts the number of single men and women in various cities throughout the country. Soma took his data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.”
Via ijreview

Series of Maps Show Where Single Americans Have the Best Chances of Getting a Date

Jonathan Soma is a member of NYU’s faculty and an expert at “making unapproachable data accessible.”

That’s exactly what he’s done with this monolithic project of a map that charts the number of single men and women in various cities throughout the country. Soma took his data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.”

Via ijreview

Filed under maps mapping dating single

9 notes

This Map Shows Just How Divided the U.S. Was on Civil Rights in 1949
“

Using this simple 1949 map, you can see how varied civil rights law was across the nation before the passage of the federal Civil Rights Act in 1964.


States without stripes or polka-dots—on the West Coast, or in the Midwest, Mid-Atlantic, and southern New England—had laws in place forbidding discrimination. Striped states in the South and Southwest enforced or permitted segregation. States in the Mountain West and northern New England had no laws in place, and bear polka dots to signify this lack. Numbers indicate the passage of laws governing segregation in particular arenas of public life, either supporting or condemning the practice (depending on the status of the state).”

via Slate’s The Vault

This Map Shows Just How Divided the U.S. Was on Civil Rights in 1949

Using this simple 1949 map, you can see how varied civil rights law was across the nation before the passage of the federal Civil Rights Act in 1964.

States without stripes or polka-dots—on the West Coast, or in the Midwest, Mid-Atlantic, and southern New England—had laws in place forbidding discrimination. Striped states in the South and Southwest enforced or permitted segregation. States in the Mountain West and northern New England had no laws in place, and bear polka dots to signify this lack. Numbers indicate the passage of laws governing segregation in particular arenas of public life, either supporting or condemning the practice (depending on the status of the state).”

via Slate’s The Vault

Filed under maps mapping civil rights racism equality